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Warleggan People & Property

Population Counts

Inhabited houses

  

Uninhabited houses

  

Families

  

Persons

1801

1811

 

1801

1811

 

1801

1811

 

1801

1811

37

43

 

1

2

 

43

49

 

166

228

 
Magna Britannia 1814
 
The manor of Warleggon, together with the advowson of the rectory, has long been in the family of Gregor, and is now the property of Francis Gregor, Esq., of Trewarthenick. Another manor of Warleggon belonged to the Coryton family, of whom it was purchased, in 1680, by John Trengove, otherwise Nance, Esq., by whose descendant, James Wyard Gooch, Esq. (some time of Trengoffe, now of Orford in Suffolk), it was alienated, in 1803, to Edward Angove, Esq., who at the same time purchased the barton of Trengoffe, (formerly esteemed a manor,) which had been successively in the families of Molins, Hungerford, and Hastings. This manor has been lately offered for sale. Trengoffe or Trengove gave name to an ancient family, by whom the barton was sold to the Tubbs: in Norden's time, it was the seat of John Tubb, Esq.: after continuing in this family for some descents, it was sold to the Parkers, and by the latter to John Trengove alias Nance, said to have been descended from a younger branch of the family, who sold this barton to the Tubbs. (fn. 11)
The manor of Carborro or Carburrow, and the barton of Trevedoe, have been for a considerable time in the family of their present proprietor, Arscott Bickford, Esq., of Dunsland in Devonshire. Part of the old mansion is inhabited as a farm-house; the remainder is reserved for the purpose of holding the manor courts.

 
A Topographical Description of England, 1838, Thomas Moule
 
WARLEGGON, 6 miles E. from Bodmin, and 8 miles N.W. from Liskeard, contains 50 houses and 296 inhabitants, including the hamlet of Bofindle. The church, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, is a rectory, value £5.17s. 6d.
 
 
A Topographical Dictionary of England, 1848, Samuel Lewis
 

WARLEGGON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 5¾ miles (E. N, E.) from Bodmin; containing 277 inhabitants. It comprises 1900 acres, of which 500 are common or waste; the surface is hilly, the soil peaty, and in many parts encumbered with slate. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 17. 6., and in the gift of G. W. F. Gregory, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for an annual rent-charge of £170; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 9 acres.
 
The Parish of Warleggan
 
The Parish of Warleggan is a fairly small one as moorland parishes go - only 2,800 acres. It lies between the two very large parishes of Cardynham and St Neot. The boundaries are largely rivers: on the east, the river Dewy; in the south the river Fowey; and, on much of the west, the river with another lovely name -Bedalder.
 
The village of Warleggan itself has been described in one guidebook as "the loneliest village on Bodmin Moor". It is not bleak, as are some of those further north, but it is still hard to reach until the connecting road to the A30 was built not very long ago, it must have been even harder. The main centre is the village of Mount, through which the mail-coaches used to rumble on what was once the main road from Bodmin to Liskeard.
 
"Warleggan", originally "Worlegan", is similar to a Welsh word meaning "a high place". The highest: point in the parish is Carburrow Tor, not far north of the church: it is 912 ft.
 
The first recorded Lord of the Manor of "Wrlegan" is Roger of Deviock - a farm in Cardinharn - in 1260. Slightly earlier, Roger granted some of this land to "William the Smith". The annual rent was 2d, or one pair of spurs, at Michaelmas. The chief house in the parish was for centuries the magnificent Trengoffe Barton, burnt down not long ago. It was progressively the home of the Tubbe, Parker, Nance and Angove families. Other Bartons are Trevorder, Bofindle, Dewy, Holtroad, Tor and Carhurrow
 
Panter's Bridge, the lovely little bridge on the road from Mount to St. Neot, was once (1238) Pontyesu - Jesus' Bridge, a beautiful name. There were once very large tin workings in the parish. The Treveddoe mines and quarries are extensive, and were partly worked till 1945. They are dangerous to visit.
 
A hundred years ago, the population of the parish was twice its present figure.
 
The Church
 
The church is dedicated to St Bartholomew, not to a local saint like those of its neighbours, St Neot, and St Meubred at Cardynham. The original building is therefore post-Conquest. It was probably a converted manorial chapel. The nave is the oldest part of the church, built in the eleven-hundreds. The north wall (beside the pulpit) is a rubble one. Though the builders of those days could work "moor stone" (granite), as the ancient crosses show, they did not build in it till the 15th century, when the rest of the church was finished: the five irregular arches and the south aisle (where is the organ). In the north wall is a Norman window (near the tower), which was moved east at some time, and traces of a stopped-up door.
 
The interior of the church was restored in the 19th century. Though we may not admire their taste, we are glad they did the work when they could afford it. The font is 15th century. The very large organ is a First War memorial. In the floor beyond it is the mark where an ancient brass was stolen long ago It would have been exactly like the magnificent one still in place in Cardynham church. On the pillars are various simple devices which are probably the badges badges ("rebus") of families which helped to pay for the work; the "Bear's head couped" would be the Beres of Treveddoe.
 
The rather strange shape of the tower is the result of its having once mounted a steeple unusual in Cornwall. In March, 1818, this was struck by lightning and fell on the church, doing very much harm. To pay for repairs, two of the three bells were sold, leaving us our one survivor.
 
The church, though at present protected by beeches, is in fact very exposed and high above sea-level, nearly 800 ft. Outside the porch is an ancient cross, long used as a gatepost at Carburrow. It is, perhaps, 8th century. In the church, opposite the door, is a fine Norman capital (head of a pillar) which may have come from the former Bodmin Priory.
 
 
Some Clergy
 
Like other small parishes in Cornwall, Warleggan was sometimes neglected by its priests. John Wak (1244), the first recorded Rector, had many parishes and lived in none.
 
The second, John Tremur, was away in Oxford from 1328 to 1331. The Bishop gave him permission because he was so clever, and because his predecessor had let the church and house decay. His son, Ralph, was a "near-heretic, denying the Real Presence and burning the Host". He was left free because he too was very clever, and spoke so many languages.
 
Daniel Baudris, of 1706, was a French refugee; he tended the parish well. He reported that there were 26 families and no dissenters.
 
Samuel Gurney, of 1746, lived far away at Tregony, had two other churches and ran a Grammar School. Francis Cole, curate in 1774, and vicar of Luxulyan, is said to haunt the road outside Trengoffe. His carriage wheels are said to be still audible.
 
The Patrons of the living were, from 1480 to 1860, the Courtenays of Deviock (till 1660) and then the Gregors of Trewarthenick. Now, the Diocesan Patronage Board appoints the Rectors. Warleggan is an independent parish with its own Rector, whom it shares with the parish of St Neot.
 

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Contributed by Pauline Pickup